How to Make Reed Diffuser Oil
Reed diffusers have become very popular, and it’s not surprising that many people want to make their own reed diffuser oil using essential oils. Most store-bought reed diffusers use synthetic fragrances, but making your own natural reed diffuser oil with essential oils is simple. This article outlines how to make your own reed diffuser oil.
Reed Diffuser Oil Ingredients:
There are two basic components of natural reed diffuser oils:
1. Essential oils, which provide the fragrance. You also may use synthetic fragrance oils.2. Reed diffuser oil base, such as a pre-mixed reed diffuser base oil or Dipropylene glycol (fragrance grade). The base dilutes the essential oil or fragrance oil, and helps the reed diffuser oil wick up the reeds.
There is a third ingredient which you may not need for every reed diffuser oil you make, but may want to have on hand (especially if you use dipropylene glycol, fragrance grade, as the reed diffuser oil base):
3. Perfumer’s alcohol, which thins the diffuser oil to allow better wicking.
Essential Oils to Use in a Reed Diffuser Oil
Your imagination is nearly your only limit when it comes to which essential oils to use in your reed diffuser oil. Use a single oil or a blend. See Aromatherapy Recipes for blends and inspiration. But note that thick or heavy essential oils do not work well in reed diffuser oil blends.
If you want a reed diffuser oil that is as strongly fragrant as store-bought reed diffusers, you may need to user synthetic fragrance oil instead of essential oil.
Combining Ingredients to Make Reed Diffuser Oils
Make your reed diffuser oil with about 30% to 40% essential oil and about 60% to 70% dipropylene glycol or reed diffuser base oil. Slightly more or slightly less of either ingredient should work, too. If the diffuser oil is too thick (viscous) and doesn’t absorb up the reeds well, you can add 5% or 10% perfumer’s alcohol to make your formula more wickable. See the basic Reed Diffuser Oil Recipe for specific ingredient amounts.
(via wlnaturalhealth.com)

How to Make Reed Diffuser Oil

Reed diffusers have become very popular, and it’s not surprising that many people want to make their own reed diffuser oil using essential oils. Most store-bought reed diffusers use synthetic fragrances, but making your own natural reed diffuser oil with essential oils is simple. This article outlines how to make your own reed diffuser oil.

Reed Diffuser Oil Ingredients:

There are two basic components of natural reed diffuser oils:

1. Essential oils, which provide the fragrance. You also may use synthetic fragrance oils.
2. Reed diffuser oil base, such as a pre-mixed reed diffuser base oil or Dipropylene glycol (fragrance grade). The base dilutes the essential oil or fragrance oil, and helps the reed diffuser oil wick up the reeds.

There is a third ingredient which you may not need for every reed diffuser oil you make, but may want to have on hand (especially if you use dipropylene glycol, fragrance grade, as the reed diffuser oil base):

3. Perfumer’s alcohol, which thins the diffuser oil to allow better wicking.

Essential Oils to Use in a Reed Diffuser Oil

Your imagination is nearly your only limit when it comes to which essential oils to use in your reed diffuser oil. Use a single oil or a blend. See Aromatherapy Recipes for blends and inspiration. But note that thick or heavy essential oils do not work well in reed diffuser oil blends.

If you want a reed diffuser oil that is as strongly fragrant as store-bought reed diffusers, you may need to user synthetic fragrance oil instead of essential oil.

Combining Ingredients to Make Reed Diffuser Oils

Make your reed diffuser oil with about 30% to 40% essential oil and about 60% to 70% dipropylene glycol or reed diffuser base oil. Slightly more or slightly less of either ingredient should work, too. If the diffuser oil is too thick (viscous) and doesn’t absorb up the reeds well, you can add 5% or 10% perfumer’s alcohol to make your formula more wickable. See the basic Reed Diffuser Oil Recipe for specific ingredient amounts.

(via wlnaturalhealth.com)

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