scissorsandthread
scissorsandthread:

Brooch Ribbon Necklace | Martha Stewart
My new favourite jewelry store Lovisa is having a massive sale and they have a ton of gorgeous brooches… that all look great grouped together but not so much by themselves! Sometimes I come across DIYs that seem to know what I’m thinking! If you don’t have a Lovisa near you (sorry!) try op shops - I’m sure you’ll find some hidden gems!

scissorsandthread:

Brooch Ribbon Necklace | Martha Stewart

My new favourite jewelry store Lovisa is having a massive sale and they have a ton of gorgeous brooches… that all look great grouped together but not so much by themselves! Sometimes I come across DIYs that seem to know what I’m thinking! If you don’t have a Lovisa near you (sorry!) try op shops - I’m sure you’ll find some hidden gems!

Upcycled Ladder Plant Stand

 
Plant Stand Ladder Craft
Display brilliant blooms on this stepladder-cum-potted plant showcase:  
By Bernadette Baczynski Posted October 14, 2009 from Ty Pennington at Home.

Turn a ladder into a pretty plant stand to give a gardener just the space he or she needs for displaying bright blooms. Painted and anchored to the wall, the stand can hold sun-loving plants—and a few gardening books, too. 

Skill Level: Beginner

Materials: Hand drill and bits; wooden stepladder with paint tray, about 5 or 6 feet tall; sandpaper; tack cloth; acrylic paint; paintbrush; ruler; pencil; 2 small “L” brackets with hardware; wall anchors; hammer. 
Directions:
1. Using drill with screwdriver bit, remove back of ladder, leaving paint tray intact.
2. Sand front of ladder. Wipe off dust with tack cloth. Apply two or more coats of paint, letting dry after each coat.
3. Measure and mark placement of brackets on underside of top step of ladder. Drill pilot holes at marks; attach brackets to ladder.
4. Lean ladder against wall; mark bracket placement on wall. Drill pilot holes in wall, hammer in wall anchors and screw in place to attach brackets to wall.
 
Photo: © Deborah Ory

Upcycled Ladder Plant Stand

Plant Stand Ladder Craft Display brilliant blooms on this stepladder-cum-potted plant showcase:   By Bernadette Baczynski Posted October 14, 2009 from Ty Pennington at Home. Turn a ladder into a pretty plant stand to give a gardener just the space he or she needs for displaying bright blooms. Painted and anchored to the wall, the stand can hold sun-loving plants—and a few gardening books, too.  Skill Level: Beginner

Materials: Hand drill and bits; wooden stepladder with paint tray, about 5 or 6 feet tall; sandpaper; tack cloth; acrylic paint; paintbrush; ruler; pencil; 2 small “L” brackets with hardware; wall anchors; hammer.

Directions:

1. Using drill with screwdriver bit, remove back of ladder, leaving paint tray intact.

2. Sand front of ladder. Wipe off dust with tack cloth. Apply two or more coats of paint, letting dry after each coat.

3. Measure and mark placement of brackets on underside of top step of ladder. Drill pilot holes at marks; attach brackets to ladder.

4. Lean ladder against wall; mark bracket placement on wall. Drill pilot holes in wall, hammer in wall anchors and screw in place to attach brackets to wall.

Photo: © Deborah Ory

Pour Spout Mason Jars

When finished with an empty cardboard salt container, cut the whole round top piece off and measure to fit a canning jar ring. Trace and cut with the flat part with scissors to fit a pint canning jar. Fill the jar with sugar, then cut a second one from a second empty salt container for non-dairy coffee creamer, spices, or flour. The pour spouts make for easy access to your sugar and creamer. 
*If desired, half pint jars can be used instead of pint jars.
By Monica from Cortez, CO (via thriftyfun.com)

Pour Spout Mason Jars

When finished with an empty cardboard salt container, cut the whole round top piece off and measure to fit a canning jar ring. Trace and cut with the flat part with scissors to fit a pint canning jar. Fill the jar with sugar, then cut a second one from a second empty salt container for non-dairy coffee creamer, spices, or flour. The pour spouts make for easy access to your sugar and creamer.

*If desired, half pint jars can be used instead of pint jars.

By Monica from Cortez, CO (via thriftyfun.com)

Low Cost Outdoor Lighting
Better Homes and Gardens has a great idea for repurposing these farm supply staples into a rustic and reflective candle holder.

Low-Cost Lighting 
For any outdoor room, you should always install outdoor lighting, but that doesn’t need to be an expensive endeavor. These candle holders are actually heavy-gauge feed scoops from a farm-supply store (they also can be purchased online). Screw them directly into a stud or use an anchor to attach them to a wall.
(via BHG)

Low Cost Outdoor Lighting

Better Homes and Gardens has a great idea for repurposing these farm supply staples into a rustic and reflective candle holder.

Low-Cost Lighting

For any outdoor room, you should always install outdoor lighting, but that doesn’t need to be an expensive endeavor. These candle holders are actually heavy-gauge feed scoops from a farm-supply store (they also can be purchased online). Screw them directly into a stud or use an anchor to attach them to a wall.

(via BHG)

Upcycled Bicycle 
Don’t let that rusty bicycle or wheelbarrow go to waste, taking up space in your garage.  Instead, roll it into the garden and upcycle it as a planter, like this one featured a while back in Pottery Barn.
Even if the bike or barrow isn’t exactly antique, a coat or two of matte brown spray paint will easily cover any bright colors or brand names. 
You can use sturdy wire (like an untwisted clothes hanger) to wrap around pots and attach them to the bike.  The wheelbarrow option is easiest because you can plant directly in it.

Upcycled Bicycle 

Don’t let that rusty bicycle or wheelbarrow go to waste, taking up space in your garage.  Instead, roll it into the garden and upcycle it as a planter, like this one featured a while back in Pottery Barn.

Even if the bike or barrow isn’t exactly antique, a coat or two of matte brown spray paint will easily cover any bright colors or brand names. 

You can use sturdy wire (like an untwisted clothes hanger) to wrap around pots and attach them to the bike.  The wheelbarrow option is easiest because you can plant directly in it.